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© Bo Johannsen
© Bo Johannsen
© Ole Akhøj
© Bo Johannsen

Christina Schou Christensen

Christina Schou Christensen Ceramicist
Contact
Danish, English
Hours:
By appointment only
Phone:
+45 61689092
© All rights reserved

Ceramic surprises

  • • Christina uses glaze to create form
  • • She has an elaborate working process
  • • Ongoing glaze development is part of her work

About eight years ago the ceramics of Christina Schou Christensen made a splash during the Charlottenborg Spring Exhibition, the most recognised visual arts show in Denmark. Works of applied arts are only seldom exhibited here, and on top of that, Christina's ceramic objects were non-figurative – clumps of clay resting on stiffened molten glaze. Exploring the possibilities of ceramic glaze is still her main interest and she is continuously discovering new methods to develop glazes. Lately, she has investigated how finished, fired glaze can be melted again and slumped to obtain surprising effects and make the spectator stop, observe and reflect. A refinement of both technique and artistic expression is Christina's goal.

Read the full interview

Works

  • © Christina Schou Christensen
  • © Dorthe Krogh
  • © Christina Schou Christensen
  • © Ole Akhøj
  • © Jeppe Gudmundsen
Photo: © Christina Schou Christensen
Petroleum Bubbles 1

This sculpture, crafted from stoneware, is an example of Christina’s investigation into the use of fluid glaze as a central and decisive element of the artwork's final shape. In the last stage of creation, glaze is poured into the pierced structure to create natural organic forms.

Height 15 cm
Width 12 cm

Photo: © Dorthe Krogh
Fluid Cream

Fluid Cream forms part of a series in which Christina experimented with glaze, exploring the maximum amount that could be incorporated into a ceramic sculpture. The glaze, mixed with different hues, was developed especially for this piece, resulting in a creamy white glaze flowing from a soft beige structure.

Height 35 cm
Width 22 cm

Photo: © Christina Schou Christensen
Orange Bubbles

This sculpture, crafted from stoneware, is an example of Christina’s investigation into the use of fluid glaze as a central and decisive element of the artwork's final shape. In the last stage of creation, glaze is poured into the pierced structure to create very thin and fragile organic drops.

Height 18 cm
Width 30 cm

Photo: © Ole Akhøj
Extruded Glaze

When exploring the possibilities of how to shape fluid glaze, Christina has in this piece used a technique called extrusion. By making a star-shaped hole in the container, the glaze takes on a special form, just like soft ice cream.

Height 18 cm
Width 8 cm

Photo: © Jeppe Gudmundsen
Soft Folds

Before a spray glazed ceramic piece is given its final firing in the kiln, it has a very soft and often dry, pastel-like look, just like powdered sugar on a cake, or the soft fabric of a pillow. In this piece, that stage of the ceramic process has been maintained, as Christina explores both the softness of the clay and the dry engobe.

Height 50 cm
Width 25 cm

Enjoy an experience with Christina Schou Christensen

Find Christina Schou Christensen in the itinerary

Bornholm: the wonders of the craft island
8 locations
Situated near the coasts of Denmark and Germany, Bornholm is widely recognised as an island of craft. Home to many talented craftspeople, a day in Bornholm is a chance to discover traditional craftsmanship.
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