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Presented by logo Homo Faber by Michelangelo Foundation
Explore Discover Visit Experience Itineraries About
Karin Olanders©Michelangelo Foundation
Karin Olanders©Michelangelo Foundation
Karin Olanders©Michelangelo Foundation
Karin Olanders©Michelangelo Foundation
Karin Olanders©Michelangelo Foundation

Sara Lundkvist

Sara Lundkvist Glass fuser
Contact
Swedish, English
Hours:
Tuesday to Friday 11:00 - 18:00, Saturday 11:00 - 16:00, Sunday 12:00 - 16:00
Phone:
+46 0703004604
Karin Olanders©Michelangelo Foundation

Otherworldly glass

  • • Sara is a member of the Swedish glass collective Boom!
  • • She believes in the importance of sharing knowledge
  • • She has a love-hate relationship towards her material

Having a hard time choosing a profession, the young Sara Lundkvist wanted to become an artist, a ceramicist or perhaps a designer – being in a creative field was inevitable. The reasons why she chose glass are many; the material provides a huge challenge due to the heat required to work it and the high level of knowledge the creative process demands. Sara was drawn to the all encompassing nature of the material. She had her first experience of glass blowing in 2002 during a summer break from art school; the process captured her and she found herself enrolling in a professional glass course. She has been running her own studio since 2012 and nowadays is renowned within the Swedish craft scene for her individual expression, but also as a member of Boom!, the female glass group which collaborates on group exhibitions and projects.

Read the full interview

Works

  • Karin Olanders©Michelangelo Foundation
  • Karin Olanders©Michelangelo Foundation
  • Karin Olanders©Michelangelo Foundation
  • Karin Olanders©Michelangelo Foundation
  • Karin Olanders©Michelangelo Foundation
Photo: Karin Olanders©Michelangelo Foundation
Ring i Ring

Ring i Ring is a glass cast object where rings are connected loosely to one another creating links like a chain. The design of the object required Sara Lundkvist to work against the technical qualities of the glass. The form is part of her material explorations to give deeper importance to objects. She creates objects that could come from another world, with mysterious darkness with a rich array of colours.

Photo: Karin Olanders©Michelangelo Foundation
The golden stone

The golden stone, a hand blown and silver mirrored glass sculpture, was inspired by the history and legends of alchemy and the pursuit of creating gold. Much of Sara Lundkvist’s work is inspired by notions of magical phenomena, spiritually and science fiction, imbuing her pieces with a mysterious quality through a masterful manipulation of glass colour.

Photo: Karin Olanders©Michelangelo Foundation
Ring

These glass cast objects, two of a series of 30 rings with rainbow-like colours, were commissioned for a hospital in 2020. The rings could symbolise portals to another world or maybe dreamcatchers to catch your bad dreams. Much of Sara Lundkvist’s work is inspired by notions of magical phenomena, spiritually and science fiction, imbuing her pieces with a mysterious quality through a masterful manipulation of glass colour.

Photo: Karin Olanders©Michelangelo Foundation
In and Out

These hand blown glass bowls are one of the few functional objects made by Sara Lundkvist. The bowls come in many different colours. They have a double wall of glass which makes the contents of the bowl seem to float.

Photo: Karin Olanders©Michelangelo Foundation
Dots

These blown and cast glass objects are from Sara Lundkvist’s Map of Wonders series. The series also features a number of smaller objects that could come from another world. Sara Lundkvist’s work is inspired by notions of magical phenomena, spiritually and science fiction, imbuing her pieces with a mysterious quality through a masterful manipulation of glass and colour.

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