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Kenji Fuchiwaki

Kenji Fuchiwaki Ceramicist
Contact
German, English, Japanese
Hours:
By appointment only
Phone:
+49 7141186506
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Bridging ceramics past and present

  • • Kenji focuses on glazes and turned shapes
  • • His interest in science and maths infuses his work
  • • He combines ancient principles with modern technology

Kenji Fuchiwaki’s workshop and 500 years of ceramic history are separated only by a window. Since 2010 Kenji has worked in the main building of Ludwigsburg Residential Palace, which exhibits an extraordinary ceramics collection through which he occasionally guides visitors. So like no one else, Kenji provides a link between ceramics past and present. His adventure in ceramics started in primary school when he met his master Keiichirou Inatomi, who later taught him traditional methods of working with clay and glazes. In 2002 Kenji started studying at the Freie Kunstakademie Nürtingen in Germany. Since then he has developed a unique aesthetic expression driven by excellence in craftsmanship and material knowledge.

Read the full interview

Works

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Sea Cucumber bowl

This vessel was thrown on a potter's wheel and finished with a 'namako' glaze of Kenji’s own recipe, evoking the colour of a sea cucumber. The firing was performed in an oxidation atmosphere at very high temperatures, reaching 1280˚C at its peak. This piece was conceived to showcase the glaze's distinctive colour.

Height 9 cm
Width 45 cm

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Iris

This vessel was thrown on a potter's wheel and finished with 'tenmoku' and 'namako' glazes of Kenji’s own recipe. The firing was performed in an oxidation atmosphere at very high temperatures, reaching 1280˚C at its peak. The bowl is helix-shaped and the inside and outside were glazed separately.

Height 19 cm
Width 41 cm

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Astrologia

The Astrologia container was thrown on a potter's wheel and finished with 'tenmoku' and 'namako' glazes of Kenji’s own recipe. The firing was performed in an oxidation atmosphere at very high temperatures, reaching 1280˚C at its peak. Its title refers to the thousands of iron crystals present in the glaze, giving the impression of a starry sky.

Height 25 cm
Width 20 cm

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Yume-Namako

This vase was shaped according to its name, Yume-Namako, which means sea cucumber in Japanese. It was hand thrown and finished with a 'namako' glaze of Kenji’s own recipe. The firing was performed in an oxidation atmosphere at very high temperatures, reaching 1260˚C at its peak.

Height 40 cm
Width 17 cm

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Jade

This vessel was wheel-thrown and finished with a jade coloured glaze of Kenji’s own recipe. The firing was performed in an oxidation atmosphere at very high temperatures, reaching 1260˚C degrees at its peak.

Height 45 cm
Width 17 cm

Enjoy an experience with Kenji Fuchiwaki

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